Hawthorne Beyer

Current student supervision (University of Queensland)

Diego Correa (Ph.D.)

Diego work explores the relationships between biofuel production, conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem services in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. This project involves the selection of suitable areas for biofuel production using microalgae, as well as the determination of synergies and trade-offs between production and conservation. He is interested in how the world can maintain its biodiversity while addressing increased energy demands. Diego's first chapter was published in Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews.

Tatiana Proboste (Ph.D.)

Tatiana is interested in exploring and developing tools to investigate the role of wildlife in disease transmission in urbanized environments. Her project will focus mostly on using molecular methods (Barcoding and NGS) and distribution predictive model to improve our understanding of paralysis tick across the rural-urban gradient of South-east Queensland.

Alannah Filer (University of Queensland)

Alannah has been looking at species distribution modelling and interspecific competition of acid frogs in Australia with Berndt van Rensburg, Ed Meyer and myself. We developed some randomforest distribution models at two scales that performed remarkable well (70-95% prediction accuracies) and used niche overlap to better understand the potential for interspecific competition between acid frogs and their competitors. Alannah was awarded a First for her Honour's degree and the paper is in preparation.

Veronica Gama (University of Queensland)

Veronica is a PhD student working on migrant birds and the assessment of their IUCN conservation status. We have had to deal with some challenging data problems on this project: processing 95GB text files and the scourge of working with complex collections of incedental occurrence records. Migration behaviour is really much more complex and varied that I had realised.


Completed students (University of Queensland)

Brooke Williams (Honours; First class)

Brooke worked on fire management in dry schlerophyll forests of southeast Queensland in collaboration with Luke Shoo, Kerrie Wilson and myself. We developed a linear programming framework for optimising controlled burn scheduling to achieve both asset protection and conservation outcomes. The paper has been published in the Journal of Applied Ecology.

Maddy Stigner (Honours; First class)

Maddy worked on shorebird abundance in Moreton Bay and conflict between shorebirds and other users of the shoreline (people and their dogs). Her work quantified the tradeoff between zoning restriction on use by people and benefits to shorebirds using a linear programming framework. This work was published in the Journal of Applied Ecology.

Alannah Filer (Honours; First class)

Alannah worked on species distribution modelling and interspecific competition of acid frogs in Australia with Berndt van Rensburg, Ed Meyer and myself. We developed some randomforest distribution models at two scales that performed remarkable well (70-95% prediction accuracies) and used niche overlap to better understand the potential for interspecific competition between acid frogs and their competitors.

Michael Traurig (Master of Conservation Science; First class)

Michael worked on migrant bird conservation planning. He quantifyied how well migrant species are represented by existing protected areas and identifying opportunities for improving representation of migrants in new protected areas using a global scale linear programming optimisation.

Adriana Allek, Ariadna Souza and Nicoli Eiras (Science Without Borders; University of Queensland)

Adriana, Ariadna and Nicoli were Brazilian students who worked with us for 7 months as part of an internship programme. They built a database on the life history characteristics of Australia's threatened animal species. This work is in review.

Vanessa Rodrigues de Macedo, Matheus Bandiera, Rafael Miranda, Vanessa Fujiyama, Talicia Andrade (Science Without Borders; University of Queensland)

These five Brazilian students developed a database of Brazilian threatened species and the processes that threaten them. This will serve as the basis for a review paper that is currently in preparation.

Camille Bouin (Internship; Montpelier SupAgro, France)

Camille was a French student who visited the Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science (UQ) for four months. She worked on a review of koala translocation as a management strategy in declining populations of southeast Queensland.


Other student collaborations

Chris O'Bryan (Ph.D. student; University of Queensland)

I have been collaborating with Chris and others on the link between predators and human wellbeing (paper in review).

Alex Braczowski (Ph.D. student; University of Queensland)

I have been collaborating with Alex and others on the benefits that predators provide to humans in urban environments, with particularly emphasis on control of populations of hosts that pose disease threats to humans. This work is in press at Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution.

Jamie Wadey (PhD student; University of Nottingham-Malaysia campus)

Jamie is working on the behavior and ecology of Malaysian elephants. We have collaborated on the application of fine-scale movement models to evaluate the behavioural response of elephants to roads and to quantify the permeability of roads to elephants. Understanding the effect of roads on elephants is important for mitigating human-elephant conflict and elephant conservations. This work is in review.

Rebecca Runting (former PhD student; University of Queensland)

Rebecca's PhD work related to natural capital and ecosystem services under global change. I have worked with her and Jonathan Rhodes on a chapter of her PhD work that involved planning for mangrove conservation in the context of climate change and sea level rise. We were able to account for spatial dependencies among planning units (based on the directional movement of mangroves) in an integer linear programming framework. This work has been published in Conservation Letters. I have also worked with her on the application of modern portfolio theory to conservation planning in a linear programming framework.

Edward Raynor (former PhD student; Kansas State University)

EJ worked on the behavioral mechanisms behind spatio-temporal dynamics in foraging of a large grazer in the southern tallgrass prairie. He and I worked together intensively on the application of cutting-edge movement modelling techniques to his bison data. This work was published in Ecology and Evolution.

Renato Crouzeilles (former PhD student; University of Rio de Janiero)

While working on his PhD in Ecology from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro Renato spent several months with us at the University Queensland. We worked on developing a method of incorporating metapopulation dynamics into large-scale restoration prioritisation in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. This work has been published in Diversity and Distributions. He is currently a post-doc at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro working on large scale restoration prioritization.

Carrie Roever (former PhD student; University of Pretoria)

I worked with Carrie on developing fine-scale mechanistic movement models of elephants in Botswana. This work was published in Diversity and Distributions. Carrie is now a postdoc at the University of Oregon.

Australian Research Council DECRA Research Fellow

Email: hawthorne -at- spatialecology.com or h.beyer -at- uq.edu.au

Affiliations:

ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions &

Centre for Biodiversity and Conservation Science &

Environmental Decisions Group,

School of Biological Sciences, Goddard Building

University of Queensland

Brisbane, Queensland 4072 Australia